Not There Yet

on October 25, 2016

Technology is moving and moving fast. But is it too fast? Have we reached a point where the advances in technological capabilities have outdone the ability to implement these ideas into the physical world? If two of the world’s largest companies are to go by then the indications are there that we should begin to reel in the tech.

In 2014 Amazon began its venture into the world of drones by beginning trials on its Amazon Prime Air service. An idea that aims to bring delivery to customers within 30 minutes of ordering by using small unmanned aircraft (drones) to pick up and drop parcels to the customer. The nature of this idea is so far ahead in terms of anything that we have seen before that even governments are unsure of the regulations that should come with such a service. As we see with tax breaks and working incentives to bring companies into a particular area we are now beginning to see governments competing by either giving or restricting access to trial such ideas. The UK government became the latest to give the OK for Amazon to trial Prime Air within their Airspace.

 

“Putting Prime Air into service will take some time, but we will deploy when we have the regulatory support needed to realize our vision.” – Amazon

 

With never before seen technology comes never before seen problems, and many have doubts that something as extreme as this could ever work simply because of society. What if a dog drags the drone down? How do we deliver to large apartment buildings? What if it is too windy to fly? What if vandals seek every opportunity to take down drones with rocks or guns? All questions that as yet have no answers.

“Putting Prime Air into service will take some time, but we will deploy when we have the regulatory support needed to realize our vision.”

Amazon

With never before seen technology comes never before seen problems, and many have doubts that something as extreme as this could ever work simply because of society. What if a dog drags the drone down? How do we deliver to large apartment buildings? What if it is too windy to fly? What if vandals seek every opportunity to take down drones with rocks or guns? All questions that as yet have no answers.

“People are the problem. And people present massive, often glossed-over stumbling blocks for delivery drones ever getting off the ground.”

Washington Post

Uber is another company who are looking to take a giant leap ahead of their competitors by greatly reducing their costs with the implementation of driverless cars. As with many other companies who are steering in this direction the problems that are faced are caused by humans. What if a human drink drives and crashes into a driverless vehicle? What if a human falls asleep? How can we implement this technology to coexist with human beings?

“It captures the imagination because it feels like the future,” Waite said. “But the future is a lot harder than they make it out to be.” – Matthew Waite, University of Nebraska

Both ideas sounds great as a concept, but can they really be a reality? Maybe. But in the meantime innovation directors are looking for a feasible, realistic and affordable way of bringing new technology into their business.


Amazon’s Prime service features drone delivery

Lots of ParceLive devices to hit the globe

Parcelive, by Hanhaa, is bringing to the market just that. An affordable, feasible and realistic technology that is easily implemented without any additional infrastructure. With many IoT (Internet of Things) products helping us with gimmicky tasks such as turning off lights or opening a door for our pets, Parcelive is the real implementation of the IoT into global supply chains to solve evident pains in the logistics industry. The ability to not just deal with human error, but to find out where it is occurring, predicting it and making alterations to supply chains and delivery based on this data is now something that is available and will change the way in which we move things around the world.

If you are interested in offering Parcelive, real time parcel tracking, as a service to your customers

Hanhaa enables an Internet of Things framework that solves a real world pain while remaining accessible to anyone and everyone. Our role is to remove the technology from the conversation and just deliver the answers our customers are looking for.

As we continue to grow as a company we are always looking to expand our outreach in order to better share with you all of the exciting things going on at Hanhaa. Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter & Instagram to keep up to date with everything Hanhaa.

We appreciate the time you invest to engage with us. Your return is a company committed to making a meaningful impact to your life with what IoT has to offer. Join us and be part of it.

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Stephen HartnettNot There Yet

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